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tv   Special Report With Bret Baier  FOX News  November 17, 2016 3:00pm-4:01pm PST

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"special report" is next. this is a fox news alert. i'm bret baier in washington. we will have the latest news on the trump transition process in a moment. first, there's some news on the democratic side of the house. there might be changes, some signals for house democrats, a change perhaps coming. the headline here, minority leader nancy pelosi is being challenged by a relatively little known ohio congressman. what does that mean? let's get the latest from mike emanuel on capitol hill. >> reporter: tim ryan is challenging nancy pelosi saying democrats will never be the majority party if they only win
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new york and california. ryan's letter to colleagues saying, under our current leadership, democrats have been reduced to our smallest congressional minority since 1929. this should indicate to all of us that keeping our leadership team unchanged will simply lead to more disappointment. ryan sounded like he was ready to challenge pelosi in an interview with fox yesterday. >> well, i don't know if i'm the solution. we need to have the conversation about who may be the solution. maybe it's nancy pelosi, maybe it's not. >> reporter: pelosi has been chased by reporters asking her about her future. she said the problem was that t presidential level and not her. she has been a party leader for more than a dozen years and fired a warning shot saying she has the support of two-thirds of the democratic caucus. today, pelosi acknowledged the tension with her members. >> there's a lot of unease. i don't see anything about what
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is being suggested now as anything but the friendship of all of us. we are family. i never said unanimity, but i did say unified. i know we will be. >> reporter: leadership elections were supposed to be held today. they were bumped back. congressman ryan has two weeks to make his case to be the next democratic leader. >> mike, thank you. now to the transition. the trump tower looks a lot like the scene of a job fair tonight. candidate for major positions are coming and going at a rapid pace. as the president-elect seeks to put together his first cabinet. a familiar name is being discussed at least for a very big position. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. in the biggest sign that president-elect trump is trying to reach out to his former detractors, the transition team announced mitt romney will meet
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with donald trump this weekend in new jersey. apparently, romney is being considered for the secretary of state job. sometime after that, trump will embark on a cross-country tour. >> we're working on a victory tour. >> reporter: the president-elect planning to visit states that helped him secure a win for the white house. in another sign of healing, trump is playing host to his first meeting with a foreign leader, shinzo abe, one whose feathers candidate trump ruffled. while campaigning, trump threatened to yang u.s. military protection of japan unless it contributed to its defense. he opposed the tpp which japan supports. prime minister abe knows how to approach, quote, strong men. he is on a charm offensive writing of trump's talents. >> president-elect has spoken with 32 world leaders.
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makes sure he listens to them, hears their concerns. >> reporter: while mr. trump is moderating his aggressive tone, his pred saecessor suggested wh. >> i think the president-elect is going to see fairly quick ly that the demands and responsibilities of a u.s. president are not ones that you can treat casually and that in a big, complex, diverse country, the only way that you can be successful is by listening and reaching out and working with a wide variety of people. >> it's a great transition. >> reporter: there was another cattle call at trump tower. >> i would be honor to be considered. >> reporter: with a who is who of movers and shakers making their way in to see the president-elect. >> world leaders, people who are
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visionaries, people who have gotten things done. fred smith, nikki haley, secretary kissinger, senator jeff sessions. these are people at the top of their game. >> reporter: the transition team continues to push back hard against those reports of disorganization. >> i have been in on the meetings, i'm on the executive committee. what we're seeing is a very ord orderly group of people working on behalf of the american people. >> reporter: aides announced landing teams, people with expertise in government agencies who will pop in to washington to build a framework -- a trump framework there. the first is the national security team. they will be making visits to the department of defense, the department of justice, the state department as well as the national security agency. back to you. >> doug, thank you. vice-president-elect mike pence says the administration
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wants to work in concert with congress. how that works in reality will, of course, be revealed after the inauguration. tonight, we look at how the vice-president-elect is handling his new duties as what we can expect when he takes off. >> we're excited about moving the trump agenda forward in the coming congress. i'm just so grateful. >> reporter: mike pence will play a critical role in building a bridge between the president-elect and the capitol hill lawmakers he will have to work with in order to get his ambitious legislative agenda moving. today pence dropped in on power players from both sides of the aisle. paul ryan and mitch mcconnell, and chuck schumer and nancy pelosi. >> we're beginning to discuss areas that we might move forward on together. that's what the american people want us to do is find a way to
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revive our economy, improve american lives, enhance the security. >> reporter: insiders say he trusts pence. >> i think he has been given a substantial amount of authority. >> reporter: pence is expected to be less of a vice-president and much more of a vice-president cheney. highly involved and independent. >> he may be one of the best prepared vice-presidents that we have had in modern times. >> reporter: not only is pence the governor of indiana, he also spent 12 years in the house, eventually becoming chairman of the house republican conference. he is also got a law grew and worked as a radio show host. >> when you add to that his personality, mike pence is from the midwest, he is low key, he is intelligent, he is unflappable. >> reporter: pence talked about how humbled he was to return to
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the hill. his visit sparking selfies like this from congresswoman kathy mcmorris rogers. i'm excited to work with him to shake up the status quo in washington, d.c. mr. pence has signed the memorandum of understanding that will allow him to receive briefings. the document that was necessary to move forward with the legal transition process. >> thank you. donald trump's election has elicited displays as we have seen of hate rarely seen in many areas of society, not normally associated with polly piitipoli case in point, a california school district that's portraying the president-elect in most unflattering terms. we have the story from los angeles tonight. >> i don't think that donald trump is fit to run our country. >> reporter: this woman attends a san francisco public school where teachers have a new lesson plan written by an instructor who says her goal is for
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students to gain a working knowledge of american racial violence and its anti-racist, an tie-sexist, anti-islam phobic history. >> we should create spaces in our schools and in our communities where students can have their voices heard. >> reporter: she says don't side step the fact that a racist and sexist man has become the president by pandering to a huge racist and sexist base. >> i don't think he respecting anybody of color. >> there are a lot of things i would like to say about donald trump. i don't care of him. >> reporter: trump has had his fair share of controversial statements. there's a fine line between education and indoctrination. >> this should not be conducted with public funds. >> reporter: the course not required but was endorsed to the district's 6,000 instructors by the teachers union. >> as educators, we are first -- our first impulse is to provide a safe space in which to deal
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with their feelings. >> reporter: students might curse and swear but you would, too, if you suffered under the constructs of a white supremacy or experienced sexism. make sure to validate feelings by saying, i hear you and you are right and this is unjust. as for students with a different point of view? >> that child is going to get taunted by his classmates or his teacher if this is the message. >> if they're for trump, they are welcome to say why they are for trump. >> reporter: district officials could not say how many teachers are using the lesson but have no plan to remove it. as for additional teaching materials, she recommends michael moore's movie "trumpland." >> thank you. the secret service says it has seized $30 million in counterfeit money in peru. u.s. dollars. operation sunset is said to be the largest such seizure in agency history.
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more than 1500 national police officers were involved, 48 arrests were made. the service says six county fit plants were suppressed, eight manufacturing presses taken and more than 1600 printing plates and negatives found. president obama's top intelligence official will not be staying on. he made what is his final appearance in front of one key committee today just hours after turning in his resignation. catherine herridge has the story. >> reporter: james clopp eclapp discussed his plan to leave government at the end of the administration. today, he made it official. >> i submitted my letter of resignation last night which felt good. >> reporter: his exit comes as the threat from lone wolf attacks like the plot in new yo york city and new jersey has never been greater. >> it involves community
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involvement. >> reporter: he was based on some of the signature foreign policy initiatives. despite the agreement brokered by secretary kerry, clapper said iran's nuclear and mrissile programs are moving forward. >> i can't say iran's behavior has changed. >> reporter: on the hacks designed to influence voters, clapper said the decision to publically blame putin's government was not taken lightly. >> we gave thought to diming out russia with that statement. >> reporter: he said the fbi direct director's decision to reopen and then close the e-mail investigation days before the election was justified. >> whatever actions he took, he did so in what he felt was the best. and i have no basis for questioning that. >> reporter: as for the 2014 isis intelligence that pointed a rosie picture of progress, one lawmaker emphasized no one has been disciplined. >> we are not able to take personnel related actions on these instances and allegations until the ig investigation is
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done. >> i have to tell you the american people deserve not to wait two years to hold accountable people who put bad information in the field. >> reporter: the committee chairman pressed witnesses on why the defense department justified the location of an intelligence base. >> i'm alarmed that we would rely on wikipedia that's known for high school students mranl ri plagiarizing homework. >> i'm surprised it comes from there. >> reporter: as clapper overseas the intelligence agencies with more than 50 years of military experience, it leaves a void underscoring the importance of a smooth transition and timely appointme appointments. thank you. let's talk about who might replace clapper with the chairman of the house select committee on intelligence.
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he is a member of donald trump's transition team. thanks for being here. >> good to be with you. >> that was something, that wikipedia mention. >> yeah. it's embarrassing. this is part of the problem i think that -- why donald trump won, because there's incompetency at every level. even at the department of defense, which i think the american people trust the department of defense. but if they're using wikipedia to justify billion dollar decisions, there's a problem. >> do you think clapper did a good job? >> he served for 40 years. a lot of that time in uniform. i think his problem has been the last few years, because the administration -- that's who he serves, which caused him the most problems. they put him in almost impossible positions trying to defend an administration that had a policy that was lead from behind. so he consistently would try to i think -- i don't want to say not answer questions.
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but find ways to not answer questions. i think he got himself into trouble. with that said, i mean, the guy had a long, good career. he did a great job in many cases. the last few years have been tough. >> you are on the trump transition team. you have been publically talked about as a possible director of cia, director of national intelligence. would you do that? >> i've told them that -- first of all, i have not been asked. but i agreed to serve on the executive committee. with the understanding that i was not going to be asked for any other position. i'm happy where i'm at. my family lives in california. i think it would be a really tough, tough sell for that. >> those are important positions. you have names of people who might be considered? >> i do. i think you have seen a lot of them that have been going into trump tower over the last few days. it's quite an organized process. it's been interesting to be involved in this.
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to see somebody from outside of government come in and kind of bring a business mind to this. what donald trump did right away was put together an executive committee. he is working out of new york now. i think they will start to transition down to washington. but what they're using me for, which i have been impressed with, is they asked me if i know someone, would i call that person, would i recruit that person? i have done a lot of that. >> representative -- >> totally inappropriate for me to give you names -- >> i will give you names. representative pompeiio. >> he serves on the intelligence committee with me. he is a west point graduate. he would do a fine job for this nation. >> heat hookstra. >> chairman of the intelligence committee for a long time. also i think he has been -- spent time with donald trump. i'm not sure if he's interested or not. i know that he is a quality guy.
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>> is he going to have problems filling some of these top spots? >> no. this is what -- the press keeps reporting this. it's ridiculous. i don't have -- my phone is ringing off the hook with people who are volunteering. i think the folks that are going to have trouble with this are the people who for the most part were trashing donald trump and never tried to help donald trump. there's good quality people that probably won't be in this administration, but it's going to give opportunities to younger people and people who have been waiting in the wings, kind of below this kind of beltway problem that we have around here. >> what are three biggest threat that president trump will face? >> actually, i always say there's five. i will do it quickly. you've got the jihad problem,
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isis, al qaeda. the china growing power of china, their expansion all over the globe. the russia problems. then you have the counter proliferation problems, which are the crazy cats, which are iran, north korea and others. and then surrounding all of that are the cyber problems. which at any given time, cyber can blow up in our face for all of those issues. and then those are the top five to me. >> of those, is there one that -- >> i don't think you can say one is more important than the other. i think all five on any given day can all be a big problem. >> mike flynn is reported to be considered for national security adviser. i know you worked with him as he was the head of dia. your thoughts about that possible appointment? hasn't happened yet, but we're getting indications it may. >> he is one of the best leaders in the military and military
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intelligence i have worked with. i met him when he was in iraq, head of intelligence there, which was one of the -- probably in our history of military and warfare was the largest killing machine ever assembled. it helped us to win the war in iraq, to bring al qaeda to its knees. if you look at the teams that he has been able to assemble over the years, he has been one of our most successful military intelligence officers in modern history. >> there's controversy that he signed up turkey as a client for his consulting firm. an intelligence consulting firm founded by michael flynn, donald trump's top military adviser was hired as a lobbiest by a dutch company. he didn't reveal this when he wrote this op-ed about turkey, that they need the u.s. support
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and that washington is harboring turkey's o turkey's cleric that turkey blames for leading the coup? his appointment wouldn't be senate -- need to be senate confirmed. your thoughts on this and the criticism that he is taking. >> turkey -- first off, when people are out of -- not in government, they represent foreign governments such as -- that's how it works here. he is a quality guy. people would want to hire him. as it relates to turkey, turkey is an ally. they are a problem child. there was a coup there. we don't know exactly who was behind the coup. what i would do if general flynn gets into a position, he would need to look at the intelligence and then to once he has all the intelligence kind of determine whether or not that would be the
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right decision. he can always -- with more intelligence, he could change his position or he may be right and we just don't know that. >> mr. chairman, we appreciate your time. come back when you can tell us about some more people. >> thank you. >> thank you. up next, president obama making a habit out of talking to the media about the president-elect. ♪ the itsy bitsy spider went up the waterspout. down came the rain and clogged the gutter system creating a leak in the roof. luckily the spider recently had geico help him with homeowners insurance. water completely destroyed his swedish foam mattress. he got full replacement and now owns the sleep number bed. his sleep number setting is 25. call geico and see how much you could save on homeowners insurance. if you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, isn't it time to let the real you shine through?
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president obama continues to pile up serious face time with the media during his farewell international tour. the president teamed up with germany's chancellor today. once again, the main topic of conversation was his soon to be
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successor. kevin cork shows us what happened from berlin. >> reporter: it was a reminder and a warning. >> democracy is hard work. >> reporter: standing along side angela merkel, president obama today said the recent political shock waves to hit the u.s. and europe should serve as a cautionary tale to never take democracy for granted. >> because we have lived in an era that has been largely stable and peaceful, there is a tendency to assume that that's always the case. and it's not. >> reporter: on what is expected to be his final overseas trip as president, they spent much of the news conference fielding questions about president-elect trump. earlier in the day, in an apparent nod to fears here of increasing u.s. isolationism, they penned an op-ed saying, today we find ourselves at a crossroads. the future is upon us. we will never return to a
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preglobalization economy. >> germany is a disaster. >> reporter: trump was a frequent critic of merkel's policy on syrian refugees. he took to twitter to take a shot at "time" for naming merkel 2015 person of the year, tweeting, i told you "time" would never pick me as personpi germany. merkel noted the deep ties would endure. >> translator: that's in our mutual interest. we will continue this. we will approach this with an open mind. we will do it with deep conviction. >> reporter: while the president remained cautiously optimistic, he challenged mr. trump to stand up to russia when they deviate from universal international norms. >> my hope is that does he not simply take a real politic approach and suggest that if we
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just cut some deals with russia, that we just do whatever is convenient at the time. >> reporter: friday, the president's schedule will expand to include meetings with euro zone leaders from france, uk, spain and italy. that's just ahead of his trip to south america for the asian pacific economic cooperation summit in peru. no doubt, trade will top the agaenda there. >> kevin cork, thank you. u.s. officials tell fox news, russia has launched long-range bombers for the first time in a year. we're told the planes fired cruise missiles into syria. the russian military says it killed at least 30 members of$3 an al qaeda-link group during an air strike in northern syria this week. the statement claims some of the organization's leaders are among the dead. poor weather and cloudy skies are hampering the advance of iraqi special forces into isis-held parts of mosul.
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but there's progress being made. some of the people terrorized under eisis rule are doing better. >> reporter: iraqi forces regrouping in their offensive against isis in mosul as cloud cover limited crucial u.s. air strikes and surveillance. no pause on the isis side though. a car bomber and a sniper leaving iraqi soldier and civilian casualties. amid new reports of anti-isis coalition gains to the west and the south of the city. on the eastern side of mosul, fox news witnessed another anti-isis tactic, males being separated from women and children fleeing the fighting. their identities checked out against a militant database and weeded out if they turn up as isis. >> translator: three days ago, we caught some of them trying to infiltrate. >> reporter: most continue to refugee camps where there is shelter and food. each stack represents 30 days of rations for a family of five.
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folks here show their identification, come over here, pick up the sacks of wheat and flour and take them to their tent at this refugee camp. the distribution is being handled by the north carolina-based samaritans first charity long active in the region. >> these are extremely important. a lot haven't had food. this is the first food that they have received. >> reporter: most are reeling from escapes with clashes and before that terror rule. this 42-year-old father of five says he was arrested and whipped twice by isis for the crime of smoking cigarettes, forbidden. >> translator: we were like prisoners. all we could do was be inside our home. there was no work and nothing to do. >> reporter: there might be light at the end of the dark tunnel for refugees. this man has hope isis will be driven out of mosul and he and his family can return to their home. it might be a while yet. >> greg, thank you.
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the suspect in september's bombings in new jersey and new york is pleading not guilty. he entered his plea today. he is accused of two bombings that injured 30 people. he could get life in prison if convicted. more than 30 fires in the southeast remain uncontrolled tonight. about 5,000 firefighters and support personnel are battling the blazes that have charred 128,000 acres. the smoke has people coughing and wheezes even in places like atlanta that are far from the flames. the chair of the federal reserve says the case has strengthened for an increase in interest rates. janet yellen cites what she considers reports of an improving economy. the fed sis expected to raise rates next month. >> the evidence we have seen since we met in november is consistent with our expectation of strengthening growth and
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improving labor market inflation moving up. >> yellen also says she plans to serve out her term at the fed which runs through january of 2018. stocks were up today. the dow gained 36, the s&p finished ahead ten, the nasdaq jumped 39. speaking of the economy, there could be major affects from any changes in immigration policy brought about by the next president. tonight, we welcome at how some farmers in the northwest are already going legal in their efforts to find workers. >> reporter: this 26-year-old is a cattle rancher there mexico. he left home to pick apples in washington state. six months in the orchard, he makes double what he earns in a full year on his ranch. he is among a growing group of guest farm workers brought in on visas. >> there's not enough local work force. there's a sign that says, need workers everywhere. >> reporter: this man says tighter border enforcement and migrants taking jobs in cities
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has forced comes to hiring work. >> the people left or they settled here undocumented and took full-time jobs. >> reporter: since 2011, the u.s. state department doubled the number of visas issued to over 108,000. it's a reversal for many growers. there is a down side to the program for growers. it's expensive. one farmer tells me it costs him on average $6 more an hour for the guest workers when he factor in all the extra expenses. the costs have to be passed to consumers. among the extras, growers pay for background checks, transportation and housing during the six-month stay. they are required to pay above minimum wage. immigration officials can't say how many guest workers go awol. a department of homeland security report estimates less than 2% of all those end up over
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staying. >> people understand that you can come in, disappear and nothing is going to happen. what we need is a system that holds both the government and the employers accountable. >> reporter: under a new president, many expect the system to change. farmers hope the wall has a door to let in as many guest workers as they need. dan springer, fox news. some interesting names popping up as potential cabinet members in the trump administration. we will go over some of them and talk about the transition with the panel after a quick break. "attention: are you eligible for medicare?"
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street. that can't happen. >> i think it's good that the president-elect is meeting with people like mr. romney. he is meeting with talented people that are going to be -- he needs good relationships with. i think mr. romney will be quite capable of doing a number of things. he will be one of those i'm sure that's reviewed. mr. trump will make that decision. >> that was the big news oust today's transition as we watched the elevators at trump tower that governor mitt romney will meet with mr. trump this weekend. he is up possibly for secretary of state. moments ago, donald trump finished up a finished up a meeting with shinzo abe. that's his first meeting face to face with the world leader. as i mentioned with the people coming in and out today, it was
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quite interesting watching trump tower. henry kissinger, the japanese prime minister we mentioned, south carolina governor nikki haley, representative jeb henserling, governor rick scott, the co-chief executive of oracle, general jack keen, a lot of folks. let's bring in our panel to talk about this transition. caitlyn huey burns and charles krauthammer. i guess that's the thing people said, wow, mitt romney after all the back and forth in the campaign. >> you know, i thought of you and charles as soon as mitt romney's name was mentioned. his blistering attacks on donald trump were personal.
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not in the general election but certainly in the primary election. i'm of the view that taking a snapshot picture of the transition at any given time is really just going to have us pulling our collective hair out. it doesn't matter to the country who the president-elect interviews. it matters who he chooses. i get some of my guidance from our colleague who is a member of the executive committee. you ran a nice clip from him the other day. none of us was involved in the other administrations. if some of the names that are being touted end up on the cabinet, we might not be getting, for example, a state the foreign policy changes that donald trump promised. and on which he was elected. john bolton, for example, a friend of ours, a person whose intellect i respect is hardly the let's pull back from our
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involvement in europe, let's soften our relationship with russia that donald trump said he was going to give us. john would be the opposite of that. >> sure. obviously, foreign policy and directives come from the president and the person follows that. you are right on the individual feelings of these various issues. i want to put up david axelroaxs tweet. a former adviser to president obama and his campaign before that. >> one thing to consider with this trump transition is that first of all, the trump campaign didn't necessarily expect to win. so this provides more of a pressure point in choosing these
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next folks. the other point is that he ran as an outsider. he ran as a businessman. he ran as someone who will clean up kind of the traditional ways of doing things. so that requires a different kind of vetting process, i think, for some of these folks. to the judge's point, he made promises on foreign policy, tax policy and those things. using that framework to vet some of the folks is important. the big question i have is whether he is wanting to bring people in who opposed him. >> team of rivals. >> exactly. or whether we know trump is very loyal to that group that is surrounding him. whether he maintains loyalty over rivals. >> you know, the definite facts on this are tough to pin down. you have people on the inside throwing names all over the place. you say they're being considered. but you don't know where the president-elect's head is. i want to put up this from jeff sessions.
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i read into that a couple of things. one, he could be attorney general. two, he might stay in the senate. he is just saying, hey, he is a great guy. he is amazing but we're probably not going to give him a spot. >> which is why the judge is right that trying to read the tea leaves here is quite fruitless. i think the criticism that the incoming administration has gotten is as david axelrod said, slightly unbalanced. at the same point they had not made appointments. he said, i don't remember being criticized. it's as if parts of the press who got used to attacking donald trump in the campaign and are just itching to start those attacks when he takes office.
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i'm sure there will be reason to criticize him. can't take a month or two off. they just have to do it. it's almost reflexive. i think bringing in romney, whether he gives him a job or not is a signal. that was one of the bitterest attacks on a candidate of its own party ever delivered by romney. for trump to bring him in i think helps to blunt sort of the pre prejudice have that he will only stick with loyalists, a small group, outsiders and the country bi will be adrift at the beginning because they will have to learn everything from the beginning when they come into office. i thought that was the most important signal of the day. of course, bringing in henry kissinger, he is mr. foreign policy. you really can't be sworn into office unless you met henry kissinger.
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i think it's in the constitution. >> he is a true brain on foreign policy. i'm not going to go through the l -- >> it was as harsh as you could imagine. >> but for donald trump to get to the point where he is meeting with mitt romney and possibly even considering a position, donald trump, who does not forget -- i'm not sure if he forgives. but he usually remembers somebody who didn't stand with him. that seemed like the news of the day. >> for mitt romney to agree to
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